Tokyo Sundubu(東京純豆腐)

Published March 6, 2017 by piggie

eatatsevenPerhaps I should have mentioned this when I penned my review on Menya Takeichi, but before I go on to Tokyo Sundubu, allow me to briefly elaborate Eat At Seven, which comprises seven Japanese eateries (including Tokyo Sundubu, Menya Takeichi et al) in Suntec City, hence the name. Eat At Seven is a collaboration with All Nippon Airways, which is almost as good an assurance that these eateries are more than decent back in Japan to get selected in the first place. And in my opinion, Tokyo Sundubu certainly impresses!

Merely judging on the number of Michelin-star restaurants in Tokyo, I guess it is safe to assume that Japan has overtaken France as the culinary capital in the world. But Japan cuisine isn’t just your sushi, ramen, and Kaiseki ryori. External influence, such as western cuisines, have been constantly redefining Japan’s culinary path as early as from the 17th century, which is one big reason why I love Japanese cuisines, retaining the heritage while embracing innovation and fusion. It is based on fusion where I feel Tokyo Sundubu excels.

Tofu in Japan can be quite a delectable cuisine. Japan has no short of stream water, these lighter water makes tofu smoother than the one we have here. Some famous restaurants (notably in Kyoto) specialise in tofu are selling their tofu set meal at a premium price, and I somehow cannot help wondering whether their tofu is made of gold! I didn’t try those famous restaurants though, but I did try tofu from a renowned hotel restaurant in Hakone, it was indeed softer, smoother. But whether it’s worth that kind of price is another question altogether.

Tokyo Sundubu claims they made their tofu in-house, but I don’t know what kind of water they are using, nevertheless, their tofu did taste soft and smooth. Even though their selling point is the tofu, they knew very well mere tofu alone probably is not sufficient to grab a pie from Tokyo’s highly competitive culinary scene (just like any movie needs supporting casts too), so they came out the idea of integrating it with Korea stone pot, along with a rich variety of other optional ingredients such as beef, chicken, seafood etc, which is why I was saying earlier that Japan’s culinary scene is dynamic, more so than many other countries in the world.

Chicken Sundubu, $14.00++

Chicken Sundubu, $14.00++

Their hot pot basically comes in a selection of 5 spicy level, with Japanese standard at level 2, and Singapore standard at level 3. I suppose level 1 is mildly spicy, while anything more than 3 is a genuine test on your readiness to undertake a chili challenge rather than appreciating the goodness of the ingredients inside. I had their basic Chicken Sundubu at level 2, and found its spiciness adequate. My dining companion ordered Asari Clam Sundubu ($16.00++) at level 3, which I found to be a bit over spicy, but for me still manageable. I like spicy food, but not to the extent where the spiciness overpowered my taste bud and render the food almost tasteless, it’s not that I cannot take it.

And by the way, due to the volume and colour of the spicy broth, the content inside are not particularly visible, that’s how it was served, and the appearance for my partner’s Asari Clam Sundubu looks almost identical. Let me scoop out the ingredients for a more appealing presentation:

chicken_sundubu-p_20170226_121341The restaurant was not crowded during our visit, but even then that probably ain’t the reason why the chef didn’t make it more presentable the way I did. As a customer, I want the ingredients to stay immersed longer to make sure it stays hot and properly cooked too. For that reason, it’s difficult to distinguish my companion’s order from mine without scooping out the ingredients, hence I won’t bother posting another picture of it here. The difference is that, the Asari Clam Sundubu has more clams, naturally, but probably no chicken (if I remember correctly). In fact, to be honest, I find their chicken more tasty than the clams. I do love seafood, but frankly speaking, their natural sweetness will all be masked over if the taste of the broth is too strong, likewise for the spicy level. Nevertheless, let’s not deviate from the fact that in Tokyo Sundubu, tofu is the spotlight (and in part, the stone pot), other ingredients are mere supporting cast. As for the rice, I can only tell it’s Japanese grains, but the restaurant didn’t mentioned whether it’s Japan grown, or specifically, which prefecture it came from.

大華豬肉粿條麵

Published March 1, 2017 by piggie

taihwa-p_20170219_135416這家大華豬肉粿條麵對於新加坡人來説,應該無須多加介紹了,尤其在其入選2016年米其林指南之後,更可算是新加坡頂級的B級美食了。即便在其入選之前,在非繁忙時段我前往光顧也須要排上近半小時的隊,現在更加不必說,這次在周末用餐時段前往,排了近1小時,還看到老外、韓國人等,令我好奇的是,他們知道該怎麽訂餐嗎?因爲雖然攤位名稱為豬肉粿條麵,但其實他們的經典是新加坡所謂的肉脞麵,多爲所謂的麵薄(Mee Pok)及麵仔(Mee Kia),而且多爲乾麵爲主,反倒很少見人叫粿條麵。

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每碗麵大概等上3分鐘,但一般上每個人最少叫兩碗,算算看要等多久?

我每次前來都是叫乾麵,自從1、2年前光顧過之後,現在最低價錢調高$1,感覺上麵條的份量也比以前少了。以前叫$4還吃得飽,現在$5吃了還覺得肚子餓。口感方面,麵條不是自制的,不過頭家經驗豐富,麵條燙得恰到好處,加上豬肉、豬腰、肉碎、肉丸、扁魚片、適量的醋與醬汁後,口感非常豐富,在新加坡是很難找到這麽令人滿足的口感,即便是老闆的親戚。

説到這裏,據聞早年在大坡吊橋頭營業的大華豬肉粿條麵是由三兄弟合作的(其歷史可以追溯到1932年,不過70年代之前的我就不曉得了),頭手就是現在大華豬肉粿條麵的老闆,三兄弟中的老二。後來因爲某些因素,三兄弟分了家,老三後來輾轉在珊頓大道、到現在所在的芳林巴刹與熟食中心同樣售賣肉脞麵,招牌名稱為⌈大華肉脞麵⌋,而且名氣也不小。至於老大,據説當年僅是從旁協助,并未親自烹煮,但幾年前老大的兒子在怡豐城另起灶爐,在未經二叔同意之下沿用昔日的招牌(至於水準…我朋友吃過後搖搖頭,我也就無意嘗試了),後來兩家人甚至對簿公堂。所以現在大華豬肉粿條麵的官方網站强調“獨一無二,毫無分行”。

也許我去的時段不對,但今時今日,已經很難見到昔日頭家親自掌厨了,不過對我來説,大華豬肉粿條麵的水準沒明顯的差別。這次光顧,就是頭家的兒子掌厨。

吊橋頭大華豬肉粿條麵 Hill Street Tai Hwa Pork Noodle
Block 466 Crawford Lane #01-12
Singapore 190465
Website: http://www.taihwa.com.sg/

營業時間:
每天 09:30hr ~ 21:00hr
每月第一個及第三個周一休息

Tonkatsu Ginza Bairin

Published March 1, 2017 by piggie
Katsu Curry, $17.00

Katsu Curry, $17.00

I know Tonkatsu from Japan tastes great, yet Tonkatsu Ginza Bairin truly awed me. With a history dating back to 1927, this Tonkatsu restaurant from Tokyo’s premium shopping district is still a revelation! I confess Singaporeans are spoiled for choices sourcing for food on this tiny island, and I probably won’t have visited Tonkatsu Ginza Bairin if I wasn’t attracted by their 90th anniversary 50% off set meal promotion.

How Ginza Bairin here works is, you pay for your order before grabbing a seat, there would be no service charge. I actually intended to order their conventional Pork Loin Katsu Set ($17.00), but even arriving shortly after lunch hour, I was still told ‘sold out’. Really? How amazing! I settled for the Katsu Curry somewhat reluctantly. I’ll explain. First and foremost, I’m not really a fan of curry, much less Japanese curry. I prefer local Indian curry, and to a certain extend, Thai curry too. But I always find Japanese curry lacks the punch, the spiciness. Basically, it’s sweet. Not that it doesn’t taste good, but that’s the Japanese’ taste buds, a flavour they are grown accustomed with, not me. Most significantly, Ginza Bairin’s selling point is their Tonkatsu, imagine submersing the crisply fried Tonkatsu into a sinful coat of curry and loses its crisp…

Well, good thing the chef at Ginza Bairin seems to read my mind 😛

Their curry and rice are served partially segregated so that I can still feel the fragrance of Japanese rice, with the Tonkatsu nicely placed on top of the rice, far from the curry sauce. Like that, I can dip it into the curry sauce only when I wanted, while at the same time savouring the golden crisp of the deep fried flour skin. In other words, I am tasting a varying flavour of it! Now coming to the spotlight, that Tonkatsu, it’s extraordinary juicy, with the pork so sweet I began wondering whether it came from Japan? I couldn’t resist double checking my receipt to see if I ordered Black Pig Katsu Curry by mistake. For those who are still not yet aware, Japan probably serves the best pork in the world, just like their renowned Wagyu. In Iberico ham, Spain probably has its own bragging right, but that is cured ham after all, it’s a different league altogether. The best pork in Japan comes from Kagoshima, notably their black pork (Kurobuta), which even the locals there struggled to find it in Tokyo, or otherwise at a much premium price.

I got so much obsession that I brought the old folks back over the weekend. However, this time round, the queue was some 15 meters long! Looking at the rate it was snaking, I anticipated a wait of no less than an hour. Forget it, back another day.

2nd Visit

I revisited Ginza Bairin in mid April 2017.

This time, for Ginza Bairin’s 1-for-1 birthday treat where my friend and I ordered their Iberian Pork Katsu Curry ($21.50) and Black Pig Katsu Curry ($20.00) respectively.

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Kurobuta Katsu Curry, $20.00

Identical to my previous order of Katsu Curry? Well, I couldn’t tell the difference in taste too. Granted, I might have long forgotten the taste of their Katsu Curry, somehow, I feel my previous order tasted better though. But there’s really lots of factors contributing to the differential, such as a different cook, how long has the pork de-frozen etc.

Iberian_Pork_Katsu_Curry-P_20170422_140215

Iberian Katsu Curry, $21.50

All pictures above looking similar huh? We ordered different meal just so we could taste the difference between Kurobuta (Black Pig) and Iberian Pork. But truth be told, we could hardly tell any. Japan is famous for Kurobuta, but not Iberian pork actually. Typical Iberian pork (Jamón ibérico) are seasoned like bacon, a generic way the Iberian peninsula natives pride themselves for over thousand years, and genuine Iberian ham ain’t probably gonna come this cheap.

Bottom line, unless your taste bud can really taste the difference, or else you will find their normal Katsu Curry good enough.

Tonkatsu Ginza Bairin (銀座梅林)
2 Orchard Turn
ION Orchard #B4-39/40/41/42
Singapore 238801
Tel: +65 65098101
Website: http://www.ginzabairin.sg/

Opening Hours:
Daily – 11:00hr ~ 22:00hr

Menya Takeichi 麺屋武一

Published December 17, 2016 by piggie

I have heard about Chef KANAYA Mamoru in his Buta God days at Ramen Champion, though I have never tried his ramen before. I used to have the perception he’s more gimmicky than his ramen prowess, but my initial impression was immensely overwritten after visiting Menya Takeichi, where he is so-called ‘temporary’ helming.

Anyway, Menya Takeichi was hailed from Tokyo’s Shinbashi (also known as Shimbashi), and is quite a reputable ramen chain in Japan when it comes to chicken broth, promptly expanded to over 40 ramen outlets in the last 4 years.

Maze Soba, $15++

Maze Soba, $15++

For a change, I didn’t order the signature dish (chicken broth ramen) from the menu, and neither did my dining companion. I was very much enticed by their Maze Soba, or rather the look of it from the menu. If the picture above impressed you, I suppose I can reasonably assure you, so will its taste. For a start, the noodle used ain’t your usual soba as the name suggested, it was a flat and thick noodle that is more likely ramen than soba. I guess Maze Soba is just a convenient categorisation for these type of dry ramen which are still relatively new to the Japanese. I really want to emphasis on the noodle, which I understand is different from those used in their conventional chicken broth ramen. The texture was chewy, no, super chewy, and extraordinary smooth! It’s really an understatement if I proclaim this to be the best ramen noodle I ever tried! Then came the ingredients. You can see that ingredients are fully covering the noodle, which I actually deliberately dig out a ‘hole’ to show the noodle’s a flat, thick type. There are bamboo shoot, fried garlic, fried onion, leek, along with a poached egg, fried chicken, and grilled chicken. Before eating, stir and mix the ingredients well, and the flavour will gradually immerse into the noodle, the taste was really marvellous! I ain’t sure whether the accompanied soup is the same broth they used in their broth, probably not. It tastes good, not overpowering, but good enough to rival chicken soup from many Chinese restaurants.

Special Spicy Tsukemen, $17.50++

Special Spicy Tsukemen with special toppings, $17.50++

My dining companion ordered their Special Spicy Tsukemen with special toppings, serves with the same noodle as my Maze Soba. By now, if anyone still unaware what a Tsukemen is, it’s actually dried noodle without broth, but served with concentrated hot dipping soup, an invention by the late ramen god YAMAGISHI Kazuo. The concentrated dipping soup is not advisable to be consume on its own because it’s too salty. While ramen can trace back to its China origin, Tsukemen is an entirely Japanese invention. As such, YAMAGISHI Kazuo was held at high regard by ramen fanatics in Japan (on a personal note, I still prefer ramen with broth). Ramen Champion, where Chef KANAYA made his name in Singapore with Buta God, is the brainchild of Chef YAMAGISHI’s disciple Chef TASHIRO Koji. Let me get back to the main track. Like the Maze Soba, the noodle portion was very generous, and was served with chicken breast, grilled chicken, bamboo shoot, seaweed, and two halves of runny egg. I found it a little difficult to justify the price though, since the ingredients are more or less in same quantity as the Maze Soba.

takeichi_gyoza

Oh, as a J Passport member, I was also entitled to free 3 pcs gyoza! I had tried gyoza elsewhere, but none tasted better than Menya Takeichi’s. Almost all other gyoza I tried tasted dry, but not for Menya Takeichi, the gyoza skin still retained tenderness, and the overall texture was commendable.

Frankly speaking, I didn’t quite expect top quality ramen before I stepped into Menya Takeichi, but I walked out a very satisfied customer.

2nd Visit

Less than a month after my first visit, I brought the old  folks over. I strongly recommended them Menya Takechi’s Maze Soba, and again, it passed with excellence, so good that my mum urged me to return (again) for it.

rich_shoyu_ramen

Rich Shoyu Ramen, $13++

Rich Shoyu Ramen is Menya Takeichi’s most popular ramen from their Shinbashi outlet in Tokyo. Since this is my 2nd visit, I really should try their signature dish. Actually, Shoyu is my least favourite variance among Japanese ramen, but I will try to elaborate from a neutral point of view. The chicken broth is creamy and flavourful, and the noodle used was Kyushu-styled Hosomen. You can find leek, raddish, two tiny pieces of seaweed, one piece of chicken breast, one chicken charshu, and one chicken ball. Overall, I find this decent.

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Truffle Flavored Ajitama

We got free Truffle Flavored Ajitama being member of J Passport. These runny eggs are sweeter than what we had elsewhere, not sure how Chef KANAYA done it, but you can see its edge is lightly coated with some sort of gravy. Seriously, when my dad grabbed two, it’s a testament how great it taste!

Menya Takeichi 麺屋武一 (Eat At Seven)
3 Temasek Boulevard
Suntec City North Wing #03-313
Singapore 038983
Tel: +65 62353386

Opening Hours:
Daily – 11:30hr – 22:30hr (Break between 14:30hr – 17:30hr)

天翼海鲜 One Ocean Restaurant

Published November 7, 2016 by piggie

早几年天翼海鲜在新加坡晚间报章的曝光率很高,还请出本地资深演员陈树承“背书”,但是我瞄了下地址,躲在大巴窑工业区一堆修车行里边…没车不方便啦。前些时候,因缘巧合得到天翼海鲜的餐券,上网搜集资料时才发现,一众网上美食家的介绍都过气了,因为天翼海鲜已于今年年初搬去了万里(好像更远噢…O.o”),如果贸贸然过去旧址的话,会发现那儿有家「新天翼海鲜」,不知情者会以为与旧东家有些关系,但我上官网查却没发现有分店的资料,而且据闻口碑与水准都相形失色。

虽然说新址位于万里,更贴切地说,应该算是兀兰路(Woodlands Road)旁(搭公车的话,大路边有楼梯口直上就是),昇松集团的货仓隔壁街的工业大厦就对了,兜了个圈,还是选在工业区啊!不过,也许正因如此,才能将价格维持在低于一般餐馆的水平。但餐馆藏在小山坡上,从经过的大道連招牌都沒見着,实在不容易发现,若非熟客或有心要找,还真难找上门。

餐馆新址躲在工业大厦的地面层停车场的尽头,旁边有家食阁,里面也有煮炒摊,原来食阁也是隶属餐馆附属经营的,简单来说餐馆头家早年就是靠煮炒摊起家,因为口碑好,而慢慢发展起来。而餐馆卖的,大概都是从隔壁煮炒摊统一烹煮的,在我看来,就是在原食阁面积拨出一部分作为餐馆,当然有隔间,装潢还是有着餐馆应有的簡單用餐气氛。

当下即刻介绍我点的美食!

翡翠豆腐,$12+(小)

翡翠豆腐,$12+(小)

没听过翡翠豆腐这名堂,一问之下,得知是豆腐炒些菜类的,没想一试之下口感还真棒!虽然没有肉丝提味,但淋上高汤后,着实为原本淡而无味的豆腐生色不少,豆腐上层还有层青色粉状物,不晓得是不是海苔粉,整体感觉润滑爽口。

黑加仑煎猪扒,$15(小)

黑加仑煎猪扒,$15+(小)

黑加仑煎猪扒是餐馆拿手名菜,在去骨猪排上淋上黑加仑子汁,撒些蒜蓉,提升口感。遗憾的是,生菜有些腐烂,不知厨师有没有发觉?

四大天王,$12(小)

四大天王,$12+(小)

我由于很少吃菜类,这道四大天王中使用的菜色只认得茄子与长豆,厨师再以巴拉煎炒透,辣味是到家了,但不晓得是不是不小心撒了过多盐,吃起来偏咸,好在有一大壶铁观音茶滤口(3 x $1.50)。

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海鲜豆腐汤,$12+(大)

这道海鲜豆腐汤其实是最先上桌的,所以在品尝其他菜肴之前可以先在其他菜色改变味蕾之前尝尝海鲜汤的滋味。好些餐馆为了提味纷纷在汤里撒下大量味精,但天翼的海鲜汤则香甜,不会过咸,汤里的佐料有墨鱼、生鱼片、鲜虾、草菇、白灵菇等,与我当天点的菜色口味配合得相得益彰!老实说,3人份的话,这汤的分量略嫌过多(或者应该叫中碗的),尤其是有叫茶水的话更不在话下。

埋单的时候,3菜1汤,3碗白饭加1壶茶,加上服务费才$63.35(无消费税),可说是一般煮炒摊的价钱。当下Groupon有50%的礼券优惠,不过有人数条件,3人以上的话可以考虑,详情可上其官网Facebook浏览。

第二回

短短的一星期之内,再次回到天翼海鮮,由於不想重複,這次點的菜色口感就出色多了!

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鐵板豆腐,$12+(小)

其實上回點的翡翠豆腐與這道鐵板豆腐口感各有千秋,前者主要以清淡爲主,這道鐵板豆腐則因加入鷄蛋,在高湯煎炒下,口感更有層次,也較爲開胃。

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時蔬扒松菇,$12+(小)

這道時蔬扒松菇,雖然沒有肉類入味,可是在各色菇類競相爭艷下,口感卻又顯得相得益彰,再加上炸得厚實的腐竹,亦是很入味的一道菜。

sam_1983-%e9%bb%91%e5%95%a4%e9%85%92%e6%8e%92%e9%aa%a8

黑啤酒排骨,$15+(小)

黑啤酒排骨與咖啡排骨其實沒在天翼海鮮的菜單内,是聽聞餐館的領班提到的,可能是菜單印好后才開發出的菜色吧!雖然名爲黑啤酒排骨,但吃起來完全沒有啤酒味,微苦帶甜的綿密口感,讓人吃得津津有味。

另外,我又叫了海鮮湯,因爲與上回的重複,就不再綴筆介紹了。

天翼海鲜 One Ocean Restaurant
7 Mandai Link #01-06, Mandai Connection
Singapore 728653
Tel: +65 62563973
官网: http://www.oneocean.sg/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/One-Ocean-Seafood-401499773290483/
每天营业: 11.00am – 2.30pm, 5.00pm – 10.30pm

Uma Uma Ramen

Published October 30, 2016 by piggie

Uma Uma ramen is a ramen restaurant brought in by Ignatius Chan of Iggy’s. To quote their website, the name Uma Uma stems from “Wu Maru”, a Ramen shop established in 1953 by the father of Uma Uma Ramen’s current President, former actor Teshima Masahiko. Upon taking over the business in 1994, “Wu Maru” was renamed “Uma Uma Ramen”, a play on the original name of the restaurant as well as a pun on the Japanese word for “tasty”. Hailed from ramen kingdom Fukuoka (a.k.a. Hakata. Well, there’s actually two ramen kingdom, the other one being Hokkaido), it’s not difficult to apprehend their ramen adopted the conventional Hakata styled Tonkotsu ramen.

Tonkotsu Ramen, $14++

Tonkotsu Ramen, $14++

If I come here just to savour on this ramen, I’m sure I will leave the restaurant somewhat disappointed. With ingredients that include Chasiu (strange, this is hardly the way a Japanese will spell it), Spring Onion, sesame seeds, and egg, Uma Uma’s Tonkotsu ramen somehow lacks character. The soup leaves a significant pork scent, I thought they could have added some spices to neutralise it, but otherwise, like any Hakata ramen, they are using the thin Hosomen as noodle, which, in my opinion, at least blended well with Tonkotsu broth.

Spicy Chasiu Ramen, $16++

Spicy Chasiu Ramen, $16++

For $2 more, Uma Uma’s Spicy Chasiu Ramen is a better option in my opinion. With a generous portion of spring onions, leeks, chili oil, runny egg, and spicy marinated chasiu, this is certainly a more appetising option. Likewise, the noodle used here is the thin Hosomen. Perhaps because of the overpowering chili oil, which masked out any unpleasant pork scent, it also takes away some sweetness off the Tonkotsu from my tastebud, but this is not uncommon anyway, and I am very much impressed by its chasiu (or charshu, whatever). The two pieces chasiu in my bowl was of medium thickness, and unlike many other ramen restaurants, Uma Uma’s chasiu possesses a good flavour and texture, better than many other ramen restaurants out there.

Mazesoba Chasiu, $16++

Mazesoba Chasiu, $16++

Maze actually means ‘mix’ in Japanese (Japanese have a unique way of English pronunciation), so Mazesoba means mixing soba noodle with sauces, in this case, an egg as well. Mazesoba is the dry version of soup ramen, similar to our local dry noodle, and Uma Uma’s Mazesoba includes spring onions, bamboo shoots, leek, egg, and of course, their signature chasiu, to the soba noodle. When all these are mixed and stirred well, the end result is rather flavourful. Pardon me from saying, I find soba and udon cheaper than conventional ramen noodle in Japan, so if soba is used here, and minus the significant broth which normally takes long hours to cook, I find it a bit hard to justify the $16 price tag. I must stress, nevertheless, that their Mazesoba Chasiu tastes great, and the noodle actually tasted closer to ramen than a soba. In fact, Uma Uma created this ramen for Singapore market, but the reception was so good that they eventually brought this ramen back to their franchise in Japan!

Spicy Chasiu Don, $5++

Spicy Chasiu Don, $5++

There are actually many positive reviews on the web with respect to their Chasiu Don, perhaps more so than their ramen, but the one I ordered here is their spicy version for the same price. Uma Uma’s chasiu has a somewhat similar taste and texture to our local char siew, only softer, and they marinaded so well that makes this side dish truly flavourful. Of course, the using of Japanese rice here is a big complement.

Chicken Karaage, $6++

Chicken Karaage, $6++

I am not a big fan of Chicken Karaage, some restaurant tend to over fry them or having a flour coating too thick, hence diverting the attention away from the chicken. But Uma Uma did it brilliantly, the chicken was tender and the flour coating was adequately thin, so the emphasis stays with the chicken, not just the flour.

In addition, Uma Uma also serves bincho grilled yakitori and kushikatsu, as well as great cocktail! In a way, Uma Uma is unique, while most ramen restaurants simply focus on ramen, Uma Uma is pretty diversified, and pretty great at all front. I’m also rather surprise despite situated at a very extreme end of Millenia Walk’s Nihon Food Street, Uma Uma managed to pull in capacity patrons during dinner hours. Uma Uma also has another outlet in Forum The Shopping Mall.

Uma Uma Ramen
9 Raffles Boulevard #02-06, Millenia Walk
Singapore 039596
Tel: +65 68370827
Website: http://umaumaramen.com/

Opening Hours:
Daily 11:30hr – 24:00hr (Sunday until 22:00hr)

Ginza Lion (formerly Ginza Lion Beer Hall)

Published October 25, 2016 by piggie

I have walked pass Ginza Lion Beer Hall in Suntec City many times, and everytime I thought it was a place for drinking and perhaps fingers food, much like a pub. Not until one day when I saw them put out a billboard of their lunch time special, that I realised they do serve proper meal! So one fine afternoon, I picked a friend to join me for a quick meal before a show.

Pan Seared Fish, $12++

Pan Seared Fish (with tartar sauce), $12++

We tried out two offer items from their lunch promotion and I had a Pan Seared Fish, served with french fries, broccoli, and carrot. I was also given an option to choose between a Salsa sauce, a Tartar sauce, or a Japanese Shoyu sauce. The fish was rather soft, in fact too soft for my liking, but at least the fries were nice, close to my favourite McDonald’s, but less salty.

Grilled Chicken (Oroshi Ponzu), $12++

Grilled Chicken (Oroshi Ponzu), $12++

My friend had a Grilled Chicken, served with thyme, french fries, broccoli, and carrot. She chose the Oroshi Ponzu sauce out of 4 options (along with Demi Glace, Hot Spicy, Teriyaki). While I didn’t taste obvious citrus from the Ponzu sauce, I have to confess the grilled chicken tasted great, with a thinly crisp skin and tender texture. Guess I will have this if I return.

And perhaps you would like to order a pint of Sapporo beer to go with your meal if you are visiting too!